Brain Injury

Wilmington Brain Injury Attorneys

Representing Victims of Brain Injuries in North Carolina

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says roughly 153 people die each day from brain-related injuries in the United States.

Brain injuries may only affect you for a few days, or may last for the rest of your life. These injuries have an adverse impact on almost all bodily functions and may diminish memory, movement, vision, hearing, and emotions. In the U.S. annually, there are over 50,000 deaths, 250,000 admitted to hospitals, and 1 million visits to emergency rooms from traumatic brain injuries (TBI).

If you experienced a brain injury following an accident, consult with a Wilmington personal injury attorney with experience in assisting brain injury victims. Remember, brain injuries may be more serious than they initially appear to be; in fact, it may take time before the full extent of the damage begins to surface.

What Is a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

A TBI is an open (penetrating) or closed injury to the brain that stems from an external force (trauma). TBIs alter brain function and may be caused by a strike or jolt to the head. They range from mild - typically a brief disruption of mental function or unconsciousness - to severe, resulting in long episodes of unconsciousness or loss of memory. Severe cases may lead to disability and death. In North Carolina statutes, TBI was first referenced in 1985 within the provisions of Development Disability. The CDC has labeled TBIs a "silent epidemic” because often the signs and symptoms are not clearly apparent.

The CDC classifies the severity of these injuries with a variety of methods. The Glasgow Coma Scale is a widely used method that measures an individual’s conscious response to defined stimuli. Injuries are then classified with a score between 1 (severe) to 15 (mild). Other methods include the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Trauma Score, and the Abbreviated Trauma Score. Once an injury is clinically scored, treatment, rehabilitation, and therapy can be applied accordingly.

Symptoms of TBI

The impairments from TBI generally consist of four types:

  • Cognitive: Inability to focus, poor memory, or confusion
  • Motor: Weakness in extremities, poor balance or coordination
  • Sensory: Decreased perception, hearing, or sight
  • Emotional: Depressed mood, anxiety, or impulsiveness

Other physical symptoms include seizures, vomiting, and unconsciousness. Typically, those with severe TBIs will begin to demonstrate limitations in their ability to live independently - a lack of personal care, motivation, or struggles with daily living.

Concussions

Concussions are the most common form of TBI. They are caused by physical impact to the head or a sudden change in momentum; they may result in unconsciousness for a few minutes. They may involve stretching of blood vessels or harm to cranial nerves. Victims may also suffer a skull fracture, bleeding in the brain, or swelling. Studies suggest that those who suffer a concussion are at a higher risk of experiencing another. Certain imaging tests, such as CAT scans, may not detect the presence of a concussion.

Other Forms of TBI

  • Diffuse axonal injury: Caused by strong shaking or head rotation, common in cases of shaken baby syndrome or from vehicle accidents. These injuries result from tears in the brain, such as among nerve tissues.
  • Contusion: Caused by a blow to the head resulting in a bruise, with or without bleeding. Large contusions can kill, and may require surgery to fix.
  • Coup-contrecoup injury: A condition where a contusion exists both at the site of impact and at the opposite point of the brain.

Risk Factors and Causes

Those most susceptible to dying from a traumatic brain injury are people aged 75 and older, usually from falls. In addition, children under the age of 14 are among the most likely to fall and suffer a TBI leading to hospitalization or death. For those between 15 and 24 years of age, the leading cause of TBIs is being struck by an object.

In North Carolina, a leading method of TBI-related death involves firearms, usually associated with assault or suicide. The second leading TBI-related cause of death is motor vehicle accidents. In close third is being hit by an object.

Our Promise to You

  • National Practice with a Local Presence
  • Hundreds of Millions of Dollars Won
  • Over 30 Years of Experience
  • Experienced, Thorough & Dedicated Attorneys
  • Spanish-Speaking Services Available
  • Evening & Weekend Appointments Available Upon Request

Lawyers for Traumatic Brain Injury Victims in Wilmington

When the negligent or reckless actions of a person result in injury to another, the law allows victims to pursue financial retribution through civil lawsuits. It is critical that you choose your attorney wisely. At Rhine Law Firm, P.C., we have spent years advocating for clients with significant brain injuries and have the knowledge and resources to help you receive the much-needed compensation that you deserve. Please contact our office today to discuss your legal options at (910) 501-2474.

Additional Information

  • “Joel Rhine and his staff did everything possible to help us in a very dark period of our lives.”

    - John
  • “We were blessed to have them fighting for us and never giving up.”

    - Stewart
  • “Joel and Chris were there for us in every need.”

    - Mary
  • “Rhine Law Firm has a friendly, caring, professional staff and they worked hard for me.”

    - Becky
  • “We were very pleased with the outcome of working with Rhine Law Firm.”

    - Former Client
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